Math Is Fun Forum
  Discussion about math, puzzles, games and fun.   Useful symbols: ÷ × ½ √ ∞ ≠ ≤ ≥ ≈ ⇒ ± ∈ Δ θ ∴ ∑ ∫ • π ƒ -¹ ² ³ °

You are not logged in.

#1 2006-08-19 02:13:49

mgca
Member
Registered: 2006-08-18
Posts: 1

Where does the 'm' come from in y=mx+c

In y=mx+c, I  know that 'm' stands for the gradient of the straight line and the 'c' stands for the y intercept, but why 'm' and 'c'???

I have heard it suggested that 'm' stands for something like 'midron' (meaning gradient) in Hebrew but ?????

And the 'c' .... interCept ??

Any suggestions??

Offline

#2 2006-08-21 07:01:00

Devantè
Real Member
Registered: 2006-07-14
Posts: 6,400

Re: Where does the 'm' come from in y=mx+c

Welcome to MathsIsFun, mgca. However, this is the wrong place to discuss this...

Offline

#3 2006-08-21 07:07:19

mathsyperson
Moderator
Registered: 2005-06-22
Posts: 4,900

Re: Where does the 'm' come from in y=mx+c

Moveded.

As for the question, I'm afraid I have no idea. It's possible that it doesn't come from anywhere, and they just called it m because they had to call it something.


Why did the vector cross the road?
It wanted to be normal.

Offline

#4 2006-08-21 07:17:29

krassi_holmz
Real Member
Registered: 2005-12-02
Posts: 1,908

Re: Where does the 'm' come from in y=mx+c

m may be connected with "multiply" or something
And c is something as constant-it is used very much in calculus it means a free-of-unknowns addend, i think.


IPBLE:  Increasing Performance By Lowering Expectations.

Offline

#5 2006-08-21 11:36:10

Zhylliolom
Real Member
Registered: 2005-09-05
Posts: 412

Re: Where does the 'm' come from in y=mx+c

The m comes from MathIsFun.

Offline

#6 2006-08-21 17:32:19

krassi_holmz
Real Member
Registered: 2005-12-02
Posts: 1,908

Re: Where does the 'm' come from in y=mx+c

Zhylliolom wrote:

The m comes from MathIsFun.

Right Z:)


IPBLE:  Increasing Performance By Lowering Expectations.

Offline

#7 2006-08-21 18:33:37

MathsIsFun
Administrator
Registered: 2005-01-21
Posts: 7,535

Re: Where does the 'm' come from in y=mx+c

Naturally!

Here's something: http://www.math.duke.edu/education/webfeats/Slope/Slopederiv.html


"The physicists defer only to mathematicians, and the mathematicians defer only to God ..."  - Leon M. Lederman

Offline

Board footer

Powered by FluxBB