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#1 2013-08-05 04:57:53

EbenezerSon
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Change your subject.

Make k the subject.

1/n = (k^+p^2/hg)^1/2

I have k=(hg/n^2-p^2) as the answer. But the book solved beyond my final solution,  and even had negative or positive sign in it.

please help me understand why its had that final answer, and as well how it came by the negative or positive sign.

Thanks in advance.
This is its final answer;

#2 2013-08-05 05:04:43

bobbym
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Re: Change your subject.

Hi;

What comes after the k^?


In mathematics, you don't understand things. You just get used to them.
I have the result, but I do not yet know how to get it.
All physicists, and a good many quite respectable mathematicians are contemptuous about proof.

#3 2013-08-05 08:07:25

bob bundy
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Re: Change your subject.

Is this your starting point?



If not, please modify this Latex so we know what the question is.

Thanks,

Bob


You cannot teach a man anything;  you can only help him find it within himself..........Galileo Galilei

#4 2013-08-05 08:36:25

anonimnystefy
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Re: Change your subject.

I'd say it's:



Or maybe with k and p both in the denominator.

Last edited by anonimnystefy (2013-08-05 08:40:32)


The limit operator is just an excuse for doing something you know you can't.
“It's the subject that nobody knows anything about that we can all talk about!” ― Richard Feynman
“Taking a new step, uttering a new word, is what people fear most.” ― Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

#5 2013-08-05 16:47:34

bob bundy
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Re: Change your subject.

hi Stefy,

I'm sure you are right smile so here goes:





Ebenezerson:  That looks a bit like what you had.  But k is not yet the subject. We must deal with the square root:



Hope that is what you were wanting.


note: 



You must not just invert all the fractions to get



Try with numbers:



Bob


You cannot teach a man anything;  you can only help him find it within himself..........Galileo Galilei

#6 2013-08-05 22:37:04

EbenezerSon
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Re: Change your subject.

The  'k' squared plus the 'p' squared are on one platform, which is over the 'hg'.
And all of them are in a square root sign.

Thanks.

#7 2013-08-05 22:49:27

EbenezerSon
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Re: Change your subject.

bobbym wrote:

Hi;

What comes after the k^?

"equal to sign" and after the sign, there is a "negative or positive  sign" which confound me much.

#8 2013-08-05 23:00:35

bobbym
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Re: Change your subject.

I am curious, which answer did you like?


In mathematics, you don't understand things. You just get used to them.
I have the result, but I do not yet know how to get it.
All physicists, and a good many quite respectable mathematicians are contemptuous about proof.

#9 2013-08-05 23:23:48

EbenezerSon
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Re: Change your subject.

EbenezerSon wrote:

Make k the subject.


I had, k=(hg/n^2-p^2)

But the book has 1/n and a negative or positive sign after the "equl to sign", which is incomprehensible to me. Some help.

Please  solve it and you will definitly come across what I mean.

#10 2013-08-05 23:35:28

bobbym
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Re: Change your subject.

Is post #4 the right problem?


In mathematics, you don't understand things. You just get used to them.
I have the result, but I do not yet know how to get it.
All physicists, and a good many quite respectable mathematicians are contemptuous about proof.

#11 2013-08-05 23:53:05

EbenezerSon
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Re: Change your subject.

No.
the k squared plus the p squared are on one platform, all over "hg". That's all,

#12 2013-08-06 00:07:36

bobbym
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Re: Change your subject.

Hi;

Have you considered using codecogs? Then you would be able to latex the problem.


In mathematics, you don't understand things. You just get used to them.
I have the result, but I do not yet know how to get it.
All physicists, and a good many quite respectable mathematicians are contemptuous about proof.

#13 2013-08-06 00:28:38

anonimnystefy
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Re: Change your subject.

I'd say this is the problem:


The limit operator is just an excuse for doing something you know you can't.
“It's the subject that nobody knows anything about that we can all talk about!” ― Richard Feynman
“Taking a new step, uttering a new word, is what people fear most.” ― Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

#14 2013-08-06 00:31:58

EbenezerSon
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Re: Change your subject.

Bobbym, I cant found them at the bottom of the open window. There are few that are found there.

#15 2013-08-06 00:34:57

bobbym
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Re: Change your subject.

Is post #13 the form you want?


In mathematics, you don't understand things. You just get used to them.
I have the result, but I do not yet know how to get it.
All physicists, and a good many quite respectable mathematicians are contemptuous about proof.

#16 2013-08-06 00:59:49

EbenezerSon
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Re: Change your subject.

Yes, correcto perfecto.

#17 2013-08-06 01:04:16

bobbym
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Re: Change your subject.

Hi;

The correct answers are:




In mathematics, you don't understand things. You just get used to them.
I have the result, but I do not yet know how to get it.
All physicists, and a good many quite respectable mathematicians are contemptuous about proof.

#18 2013-08-06 01:19:53

EbenezerSon
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Re: Change your subject.

the 'n' at the bottom carries a square why didnt you bring it?

#19 2013-08-06 01:21:21

bobbym
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Re: Change your subject.

Sorry, I am not getting an n^2 just an n. I had Mathematica do that and he is never wrong.


In mathematics, you don't understand things. You just get used to them.
I have the result, but I do not yet know how to get it.
All physicists, and a good many quite respectable mathematicians are contemptuous about proof.

#20 2013-08-06 01:31:54

EbenezerSon
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Re: Change your subject.

If we take it from the start. the n has to be squared when the square root at the R.H is taking away.

By the way what is mathematica I am curious to know.

#21 2013-08-06 01:35:15

anonimnystefy
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Re: Change your subject.

But, when you clear k of the square, you will be taking a square root, which means n will lose the square.


The limit operator is just an excuse for doing something you know you can't.
“It's the subject that nobody knows anything about that we can all talk about!” ― Richard Feynman
“Taking a new step, uttering a new word, is what people fear most.” ― Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

#22 2013-08-06 01:36:27

bobbym
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Re: Change your subject.

Yes, the n^2 will disappear.

Mathematica is a computer program that is smarter than 1001 mathematicians.


In mathematics, you don't understand things. You just get used to them.
I have the result, but I do not yet know how to get it.
All physicists, and a good many quite respectable mathematicians are contemptuous about proof.

#23 2013-08-06 01:39:04

bob bundy
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Re: Change your subject.



square both sides



times hg



subtract p squared



square root



Bob


You cannot teach a man anything;  you can only help him find it within himself..........Galileo Galilei

#24 2013-08-06 01:42:28

bob bundy
Moderator

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Re: Change your subject.




You cannot teach a man anything;  you can only help him find it within himself..........Galileo Galilei

#25 2013-08-06 01:44:59

bob bundy
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Re: Change your subject.

bobbym wrote:

Mathematica is a computer program that is smarter than 1001 mathematicians.

But just those 1001.  The rest of the mathematicians are still smarter.  smile


You cannot teach a man anything;  you can only help him find it within himself..........Galileo Galilei

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