Math Is Fun Forum
  Discussion about math, puzzles, games and fun.   Useful symbols: ÷ × ½ √ ∞ ≠ ≤ ≥ ≈ ⇒ ± ∈ Δ θ ∴ ∑ ∫ • π ƒ -¹ ² ³ °

You are not logged in.

#1 Re: Maths Is Fun - Suggestions and Comments » Skewness » 2011-07-11 05:41:29

bobbym wrote:

Hi iwan_ccie;

Are you talking to MathsIsFun, ganesh or myself?

I am talking about MathsIsFun :-)

Thanks,

#2 Re: Maths Is Fun - Suggestions and Comments » Skewness » 2011-07-11 01:45:02

MathsIsFun wrote:

Thanks bobby and ganesh!

Is there a way to contact you by mail?

#3 Re: Exercises » question about how to determine Tautologies, Contradictions & Continge » 2011-07-06 10:07:06

Thanks for your answer!

So you created truth tables?
Can you show me how you did this? And how you determined the answers?

#5 Re: Help Me ! » questions about elements in sets ... » 2011-07-06 04:15:05

thanks :-)
I already did a search and also  looked on wikipedia ...
But I was just thinking to hard ... and tought what if they are asking ... to just count all the elements ... the maximum possible ways ...
But I understand that there are only 2 elements in the set given:

SET = {{1,2,{3},{4,5},6,{{7},8}},9}
-    Element 1 = set {1,2,{3},{4,5},6,{{7},8}}
-    Element 2 = number 9

#6 Re: Help Me ! » questions about elements in sets ... » 2011-07-06 04:08:21

I guess that this has to do with how the question is asked ...
- What are is the total of elements that you can get from the following set?
- How many elements can you get from this set?

Right?

#7 Re: Help Me ! » questions about elements in sets ... » 2011-07-06 04:05:08

But in this set .... {1,2,{3},{4,5},6,{{7},8}}
You can take more elements right?

Like this:

SET = {{1,2,{3},{4,5},6,{{7},8}},9}
- Element 1 = set {1,2,{3},{4,5},6,{{7},8}}
- Element 2 = number 9

The set that is actually an element = {1,2,{3},{4,5},6,{{7},8}}
- Element 1 = set {3}
- Element 2 = set {4, 5}
- Element 3 = set {{7}, 8}
- Element 4 = number 1
- Element 5 = number 2
- Element 6 = number 6

This set also had an element that has multiple sets = {{7}, 8}
- Element 1 = {7}
- Element 2 = number 8

So if we count all the elements the answer is 10 elements in total or am I wrong here ...

#10 Re: Exercises » Question about a "closed walk" in a graph » 2011-07-05 09:14:15

So it does not really matter how the walk goes in a closed walk... as long as the begin and end vertex are the same... Right?

So this means that A, B, A, B, A, B, C, B, A is also a closed walk and allowed right?

Thanks,

#11 Re: Exercises » Question about a "closed walk" in a graph » 2011-07-05 09:01:59

Thanks for the answer ...

I am just trying to understand the different walks and rules that apply to them...

So this means that A, B, A, B, A, B, C, B, A is also a closed walk?

Thanks,

#12 Exercises » Question about a "closed walk" in a graph » 2011-07-05 06:11:50

dangermulan1988
Replies: 6

Hi,

I am wondering ...
Given the following Graph:
(see image)

A walk is just something like A, B, C, B, E

In a closed walk the "begin" vertex needs to be the same as the "end" vertex.
And we are allowed in that walk to use the vertices that we cross in out walk multiple times...
So a closed walk can be A, B, C, D, E, B, A.
Where "B" is used twice and the start/begin vertex is "A"

Now ... is it correct if I assume if this is a closed walk as well?
A, B, C, B, A

Or is this not allowed?

#13 Re: Help Me ! » question about graphs / undirected tree » 2011-06-11 23:53:06

Bob,

Thanks for looking into this ... are you saying that:
- if I want to assign a root I need to add arrows to the tree?

I still don't know how to find out what the answer is ... I am not really good at math ... so due to this question I had to dig allot and find out what everything means...
I know what a tree is and a graph, and in-degrees and out-degrees and a root, and what non-isomorphic is ...

And putting all this together should result that I can answer the question ... but I just can't.

The question is basically "How many non-isomorphic "rooted trees" can be created from this tree (undirected-tree) by choosing an appropriate root?"
And we need to come up with a NUMBER of trees ...

If I look at the definition of "rooted-tree" I see a few sample pics here --> http://mathworld.wolfram.com/RootedTree.html

So I still don't know how to determine this ...

Board footer

Powered by FluxBB