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#1 2008-08-04 06:56:36

JaneFairfax
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Ideals





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Last edited by JaneFairfax (2008-08-04 12:28:47)


Q: Who wrote the novels Mrs Dalloway and To the Lighthouse?

A: Click here for answer.
 

#2 2008-08-04 08:50:34

JaneFairfax
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Re: Ideals







smile

Last edited by JaneFairfax (2008-08-04 08:53:19)


Q: Who wrote the novels Mrs Dalloway and To the Lighthouse?

A: Click here for answer.
 

#3 2008-08-04 11:44:27

Ricky
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Re: Ideals

A ring R is a field if and only if it's only ideals are 0 and R.  In other words, fields aren't interesting in Ideal Theory.


"In the real world, this would be a problem.  But in mathematics, we can just define a place where this problem doesn't exist.  So we'll go ahead and do that now..."
 

#4 2008-08-04 12:05:25

JaneFairfax
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Re: Ideals

Ricky wrote:

A ring R is a field if and only if its only ideals are 1 and R.

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smile

Last edited by JaneFairfax (2008-08-04 20:06:26)


Q: Who wrote the novels Mrs Dalloway and To the Lighthouse?

A: Click here for answer.
 

#5 2008-08-04 12:31:38

JaneFairfax
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Re: Ideals





















Last edited by JaneFairfax (2008-08-04 12:58:57)


Q: Who wrote the novels Mrs Dalloway and To the Lighthouse?

A: Click here for answer.
 

#6 2008-08-04 12:56:46

JaneFairfax
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Re: Ideals















Last edited by JaneFairfax (2008-08-04 13:00:20)


Q: Who wrote the novels Mrs Dalloway and To the Lighthouse?

A: Click here for answer.
 

#7 2008-08-04 13:04:07

Ricky
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Re: Ideals

Let k be an algebraically closed field.  M is a maximal ideal in the polynomial ring k[x_1, x_2, ..., x_n] if and only if M = (x_1 - a_1, ..., x_n - a_n) for some a_1, ..., a_n in k.

More specifically, when solving systems of n-variable polynomial equations over the complex field, there exists a solution if the polynomials form a proper ideal in C[x_1, ..., x_n].

Last edited by Ricky (2008-08-04 13:14:01)


"In the real world, this would be a problem.  But in mathematics, we can just define a place where this problem doesn't exist.  So we'll go ahead and do that now..."
 

#8 2008-08-05 15:16:37

Ricky
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Re: Ideals

The proof of the theorem in post #4 is a lot more straightforward if you use a bit more of the machinery.

Just as in group theory, the lattice isomorphism theory holds for rings modulo ideals.  Specifically, there is an inclusion preserving bijection between subrings of R that contain I and the set of subrings of R/I.  Furthermore, A is an ideal containing I in R if and only if A/I is an ideal in R/I.  In other words, the lattice composed of subrings that contain I and the lattice of R/I "look" exactly the same.  The proof of this is rather tedious, but I'm told not difficult.

Now, armed with this fact and my theorem in post #3, the proof follows right away.  M is maximal if and only if there aren't any nontrivial ideals in R containing M, excluding M itself.  There aren't any nontrivial ideals in R containing M excluding M itself if and only if there aren't any nontrivial ideals in R/M.  Finally, there aren't any nontrivial ideals in R/M if and only if R/M is a field.


"In the real world, this would be a problem.  But in mathematics, we can just define a place where this problem doesn't exist.  So we'll go ahead and do that now..."
 

#9 2008-08-06 00:39:15

JaneFairfax
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Re: Ideals


Q: Who wrote the novels Mrs Dalloway and To the Lighthouse?

A: Click here for answer.
 

#10 2008-08-06 01:20:59

JaneFairfax
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Re: Ideals






Q: Who wrote the novels Mrs Dalloway and To the Lighthouse?

A: Click here for answer.
 

#11 2008-08-06 01:42:02

JaneFairfax
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Re: Ideals















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Q: Who wrote the novels Mrs Dalloway and To the Lighthouse?

A: Click here for answer.
 

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