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#1 2013-06-06 04:36:33

Au101
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Introductory Limits

Hello everyone,

So, I've been away from maths for a while and - since I've missed it - I decided I wanted to brush up on my calculus a bit, which has deteriorated rather a lot. Anyway, I've been reading through an old textbook of mine and I've come across the line:



I don't know if I'm just missing an obvious fact since everything's a bit slow and clunky for me these days, but I can't see where the second line comes from and was hoping someone might be able to explain it to me. Thanks smile

#2 2013-06-06 04:42:47

anonimnystefy
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Re: Introductory Limits

Hi Au101

It is a well-known identity:


The limit operator is just an excuse for doing something you know you can't.
“It's the subject that nobody knows anything about that we can all talk about!” ― Richard Feynman
“Taking a new step, uttering a new word, is what people fear most.” ― Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

#3 2013-06-06 05:03:16

Au101
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Re: Introductory Limits

Ahhh thank you anonimnystefy, now I see, because of course



And then all the terms in between cancel smile That's a great help smile

Last edited by Au101 (2013-06-06 05:03:46)

#4 2013-06-06 05:04:21

anonimnystefy
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Re: Introductory Limits

That is correct! You are welcome! smile

If there's anything else, just ask.


The limit operator is just an excuse for doing something you know you can't.
“It's the subject that nobody knows anything about that we can all talk about!” ― Richard Feynman
“Taking a new step, uttering a new word, is what people fear most.” ― Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

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