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#101 2013-04-27 00:53:33

phrontister
Real Member
From: The Land of Tomorrow
Registered: 2009-07-12
Posts: 3,844

Re: My New Twin Prime Numbers

Ok. If you start calling me a mathematician I'll know our friendship is off. smile


"The good news about computers is that they do what you tell them to do. The bad news is that they do what you tell them to do." - Ted Nelson

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#102 2013-04-27 08:44:56

bobbym
Administrator
From: Bumpkinland
Registered: 2009-04-12
Posts: 85,394

Re: My New Twin Prime Numbers

Mathematics is beautiful. We are lucky to be able to study it from the viewpoint of an amateur.


In mathematics, you don't understand things. You just get used to them.
Of course that result can be rigorously obtained, but who cares?
Combinatorics is Algebra and Algebra is Combinatorics.

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#103 2013-04-27 11:30:06

Stangerzv
Member
Registered: 2012-01-30
Posts: 173

Re: My New Twin Prime Numbers

Hi bobbym

Amongst of those famous mathematicians there were amateurs like Pierre Fermat (a lawyer), Mersenne (a priest), etc. Here list of them http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_am … ematicians
There is a mafia culture in the mathematical fields and those people tends to garbage other people ideas because they are jealous.

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#104 2013-04-27 11:49:08

bobbym
Administrator
From: Bumpkinland
Registered: 2009-04-12
Posts: 85,394

Re: My New Twin Prime Numbers

Q:What do men with power want?

A:More power.

It is very easy for men to become power mad. Even easier than becoming greedy. The scientific community in general had to withstand many centuries of persecution. Then they rose to the position of power where they promptly began to persecute people and differerent ideas. They began to stifle and repress new ideas that might endanger their position of power.

Anyway,

I like Fermat, Ramanujan, Lovelace and Pascal most among that list. And am saddened at the absence of the great Forman S. Acton, chemist. He is widely considered the greatest numerical analyst alive.


In mathematics, you don't understand things. You just get used to them.
Of course that result can be rigorously obtained, but who cares?
Combinatorics is Algebra and Algebra is Combinatorics.

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#105 2013-04-27 18:55:03

Stangerzv
Member
Registered: 2012-01-30
Posts: 173

Re: My New Twin Prime Numbers

Hi bobbym

Anyway, how long do you think it would take to get 1st 100,000 digits for this prime equation? I hope it won't take too much computing time.

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#106 2013-04-27 21:10:01

bobbym
Administrator
From: Bumpkinland
Registered: 2009-04-12
Posts: 85,394

Re: My New Twin Prime Numbers

Hi;

Please tell me which equation you mean.


In mathematics, you don't understand things. You just get used to them.
Of course that result can be rigorously obtained, but who cares?
Combinatorics is Algebra and Algebra is Combinatorics.

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#107 2013-04-27 21:50:10

Stangerzv
Member
Registered: 2012-01-30
Posts: 173

Re: My New Twin Prime Numbers

Hi bobbym

Equation in this thread..so far phrontister got 715 digit prime and how about 100,000 digits prime? How long would it take? And would it fry the CPU?

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#108 2013-04-27 22:03:39

bobbym
Administrator
From: Bumpkinland
Registered: 2009-04-12
Posts: 85,394

Re: My New Twin Prime Numbers

Hi;

Nobody even knows where it would be. I would think that it would take a very long time with a desktop,


In mathematics, you don't understand things. You just get used to them.
Of course that result can be rigorously obtained, but who cares?
Combinatorics is Algebra and Algebra is Combinatorics.

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#109 2013-05-09 22:16:24

Stangerzv
Member
Registered: 2012-01-30
Posts: 173

Re: My New Twin Prime Numbers

I am revising the equation and making it harder to get new resulting prime. I named it Perfect Twin Prime Numbers. The revised equation is given as follows:

Where all Ps are prime numbers.

Example:

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#110 2013-05-10 05:21:26

phrontister
Real Member
From: The Land of Tomorrow
Registered: 2009-07-12
Posts: 3,844

Re: My New Twin Prime Numbers

Hi Stangerzv,

Yes...that certainly has made it more difficult to find solutions!

"569" should read "659".

I've changed my code for the original problem and have found prime solutions for Pₜ=2 and 3, but not yet for 5.

Pₜ=2: (from 1st 1000 primes) +/- = 7, 139, 199, 463, 877 and 6121
Pₜ=3: (from 1st 1000 primes) +/- = 3

I'm off to bed now, and I've given my computer the task of solving Pₜ=5 while I'm asleep. smile

Last edited by phrontister (2013-05-30 23:21:43)


"The good news about computers is that they do what you tell them to do. The bad news is that they do what you tell them to do." - Ted Nelson

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#111 2013-05-10 11:27:45

phrontister
Real Member
From: The Land of Tomorrow
Registered: 2009-07-12
Posts: 3,844

Re: My New Twin Prime Numbers

Woke up to this:

Pₜ=5: (from 1st 10000 primes) +/- = 17159, 32831, 62011, 70241 and 96053

Since then, this:
Pₜ=7: (from 1st 10000 primes) +/- = 81899 and 104311

Perfect Twin Prime solutions found so far (smallest):

Pₜ=2:

Pₜ=3:

Pₜ=5

Pₜ=7

Pₜ=11

Pₜ=13

Pₜ=17

Pₜ=19

Last edited by phrontister (2013-05-30 23:22:33)


"The good news about computers is that they do what you tell them to do. The bad news is that they do what you tell them to do." - Ted Nelson

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#112 2013-05-10 19:01:47

Stangerzv
Member
Registered: 2012-01-30
Posts: 173

Re: My New Twin Prime Numbers

Hi phrontister

Thanks for finding the solutions. I am setting up a website for finding my prime numbers. Maybe in the future I could offer some prize money for the larger prime (>100,000 digits) smile

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#113 2013-05-25 20:31:27

Stangerzv
Member
Registered: 2012-01-30
Posts: 173

Re: My New Twin Prime Numbers

One thing that I notice about these prime pairs is that, all of their digital root for n>1 would be in pair of 2^y (y=1..3) and 1 or 7, example, (2,1), (2,7),(4,1), (4,7),(8,1), (8,7) and special case (7,7) when n is a square number (i.e n=9). This indicates that the prime distribution is not random but organized. Unless someone could find the counter examples. Perhaps for n=9, adding this into digital root system won't change anything as 9 has zero value in the decimal system and this is why the prime pairs would have the same digital roots. This applies for all n which has digital root of 9.

Last edited by Stangerzv (2013-05-25 20:55:09)

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#114 2013-05-29 04:12:05

phrontister
Real Member
From: The Land of Tomorrow
Registered: 2009-07-12
Posts: 3,844

Re: My New Twin Prime Numbers

Hi Stangerzv,

I've done some work on what I think you're looking for, and here are pics of my findings.

I hope I've understood you correctly and that this is the info you want, but if not, please give a different example to help me understand and I'll do my best to get the info for you.

The pic with the different Pₜ values (from 2 to 13) in the left-hand column gives the results for the smallest Pₓ of each of those Pₜ values, while the other three (for Pₜ=2, Pₜ=3 and Pₜ=5) give results from the smallest Pₓ to successively-higher Pₓ values. All pics show digit roots.

I started testing for Pₜ=17, but that may have to be an overnight job while I'm asleep because after about an hour there were no results.

EDIT: The "152" in line 3 of the Sums column should read "157", which gives the digital sum 4.

View Image: Perfect Twin Primes-Digit roots.png View Image: Perfect Twin Primes-P2.png View Image: Perfect Twin Primes-P3.png View Image: Perfect Twin Primes-P5.png

Last edited by phrontister (2013-05-30 23:23:34)


"The good news about computers is that they do what you tell them to do. The bad news is that they do what you tell them to do." - Ted Nelson

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#115 2013-05-29 11:18:25

phrontister
Real Member
From: The Land of Tomorrow
Registered: 2009-07-12
Posts: 3,844

Re: My New Twin Prime Numbers

Hi Stangerzv,

Got an overnight result for Pₜ=17:

Last edited by phrontister (2013-05-30 23:24:14)


"The good news about computers is that they do what you tell them to do. The bad news is that they do what you tell them to do." - Ted Nelson

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#116 2013-05-29 13:16:36

Stangerzv
Member
Registered: 2012-01-30
Posts: 173

Re: My New Twin Prime Numbers

Kool, it seems I had overlooked the primes and new pairs of digital roots, (5,7) and (4,8)

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#117 2013-05-29 15:50:23

phrontister
Real Member
From: The Land of Tomorrow
Registered: 2009-07-12
Posts: 3,844

Re: My New Twin Prime Numbers

Hi Bobby,

Do you know of a 'proper' function in M to obtain the digital root (sum) of a number?

I couldn't find one anywhere, so I made up this one which seems to work quite well for the number sizes I've worked on:

DRoot[x_] := Total[IntegerDigits[Total[IntegerDigits[Total[IntegerDigits[Total[IntegerDigits[x]]]]]]]]

If there isn't one, could mine be squashed up somehow to eliminate the repeats?


"The good news about computers is that they do what you tell them to do. The bad news is that they do what you tell them to do." - Ted Nelson

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#118 2013-05-29 16:01:53

bobbym
Administrator
From: Bumpkinland
Registered: 2009-04-12
Posts: 85,394

Re: My New Twin Prime Numbers

Hi;

There are simpler alternatives.

How does this do?

NewRoot[n_] := (Mod[n, 9]) /. (0 -> 9)

I do not know how it would perform on decimals or negative integers. I tested it on 10 or 12 million from 0 to 100 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000.


In mathematics, you don't understand things. You just get used to them.
Of course that result can be rigorously obtained, but who cares?
Combinatorics is Algebra and Algebra is Combinatorics.

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#119 2013-05-29 16:12:42

phrontister
Real Member
From: The Land of Tomorrow
Registered: 2009-07-12
Posts: 3,844

Re: My New Twin Prime Numbers

Perfect...thanks! smile

I tested it on the numbers in the hide box on my post #115.

Could you explain what it does, in particular the "/. (0 -> 9)" part?

Last edited by phrontister (2013-05-29 16:14:41)


"The good news about computers is that they do what you tell them to do. The bad news is that they do what you tell them to do." - Ted Nelson

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#120 2013-05-29 16:15:09

bobbym
Administrator
From: Bumpkinland
Registered: 2009-04-12
Posts: 85,394

Re: My New Twin Prime Numbers

That is called a replacement rule. It says turn 0 into 9. Note the syntax because these replacement rules work on anything.


In mathematics, you don't understand things. You just get used to them.
Of course that result can be rigorously obtained, but who cares?
Combinatorics is Algebra and Algebra is Combinatorics.

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#121 2013-05-29 16:35:11

phrontister
Real Member
From: The Land of Tomorrow
Registered: 2009-07-12
Posts: 3,844

Re: My New Twin Prime Numbers

Ok...thanks for that. Learnt something new. smile Found it under 'Rule' in the M docs.

I've included your function in my code, which is looking much better now.

Here's my new M code:


This code will expand the information given in post #111 to show primes' sums and digital roots:

Last edited by phrontister (2013-05-29 17:42:53)


"The good news about computers is that they do what you tell them to do. The bad news is that they do what you tell them to do." - Ted Nelson

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#122 2013-05-29 17:34:07

Stangerzv
Member
Registered: 2012-01-30
Posts: 173

Re: My New Twin Prime Numbers

Hi phrontister

Can you find the digital roots pair (1,5) & (1,7) for the twin primes?

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#123 2013-05-29 18:07:58

phrontister
Real Member
From: The Land of Tomorrow
Registered: 2009-07-12
Posts: 3,844

Re: My New Twin Prime Numbers

Hi Stangerzv,

The digital roots pair {1,5} for Pₜ=2 occurs first at:



Then at:


There are also a couple more after that, at Pₓ=70207 and Pₓ=74167. No doubt there will be more.

Still looking for {1,7}, but have to go out now for a while. Maybe there will be an answer waiting for me when I get back.

Last edited by phrontister (2013-05-30 23:25:02)


"The good news about computers is that they do what you tell them to do. The bad news is that they do what you tell them to do." - Ted Nelson

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#124 2013-05-29 18:27:38

Stangerzv
Member
Registered: 2012-01-30
Posts: 173

Re: My New Twin Prime Numbers

Thanks for your input.

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#125 2013-05-29 21:21:13

bobbym
Administrator
From: Bumpkinland
Registered: 2009-04-12
Posts: 85,394

Re: My New Twin Prime Numbers

Hi phrontister;

Found it under 'Rule' in the M docs.

The replacement rules are a part of the Prolog programming language and make M unique.


In mathematics, you don't understand things. You just get used to them.
Of course that result can be rigorously obtained, but who cares?
Combinatorics is Algebra and Algebra is Combinatorics.

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