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#1101 2013-04-22 01:16:11

mandy jane
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Registered: 2010-09-23
Posts: 999

Re: Mandy Jane's Corner

Is it 3 am I right

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#1102 2013-04-22 01:19:24

SteveB
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Registered: 2013-03-07
Posts: 557

Re: Mandy Jane's Corner

No. The denominators of the question are 3 and 4. What we need to do is convert those fractions so that the denominator is
the same. If we make the second one 3 then it will be difficult to work out (1/4) in thirds.

The best thing to do is get them into a form where they are (something / 12)
I got that number from 3 x 4 = 12

To get (2/3) in the form (something / 12) multiply top and bottom by 4.

To get (1/4) in the form (something / 12) multiply top and bottom by 3.

Last edited by SteveB (2013-04-22 01:24:18)

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#1103 2013-04-22 01:23:18

mandy jane
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Registered: 2010-09-23
Posts: 999

Re: Mandy Jane's Corner

Hi so is it 3/12 & then. 6/4 am I right?

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#1104 2013-04-22 01:25:23

SteveB
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Registered: 2013-03-07
Posts: 557

Re: Mandy Jane's Corner

That is not quite right, but you are getting there. (3/12) is one of the fractions, but the other is wrong. Try again ?

Hint: (1/4) = (3/12)

(2/3) = ????

Last edited by SteveB (2013-04-22 01:28:32)

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#1105 2013-04-22 01:28:58

mandy jane
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Registered: 2010-09-23
Posts: 999

Re: Mandy Jane's Corner

Is it 6/8 am I right?

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#1106 2013-04-22 01:30:11

SteveB
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Posts: 557

Re: Mandy Jane's Corner

No that is not correct. Try again ?

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#1107 2013-04-22 01:33:18

mandy jane
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Registered: 2010-09-23
Posts: 999

Re: Mandy Jane's Corner

Is it 8/6 am I right?

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#1108 2013-04-22 01:34:29

SteveB
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Registered: 2013-03-07
Posts: 557

Re: Mandy Jane's Corner

No the correct answer was that (2/3) = (8/12)

Remember that the other fraction was (3/12). So what is the answer to the original question ?

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#1109 2013-04-22 01:38:26

mandy jane
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Registered: 2010-09-23
Posts: 999

Re: Mandy Jane's Corner

I am finding this hard to do?

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#1110 2013-04-22 01:38:58

SteveB
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Registered: 2013-03-07
Posts: 557

Re: Mandy Jane's Corner

(2/3) + (1/4) = (8/12) + (3/12) = ????

The denominators are now equal. The numerators can now just be added.

Do not add the denominators though.

Last edited by SteveB (2013-04-22 01:40:23)

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#1111 2013-04-22 01:42:23

mandy jane
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Registered: 2010-09-23
Posts: 999

Re: Mandy Jane's Corner

Is it 11/12 am I right?

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#1112 2013-04-22 01:43:26

SteveB
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Re: Mandy Jane's Corner

Yes that is correct. Now let us go back to Q2.

This was (1/5) + (1/3)

What would be a good denominator to use ?

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#1113 2013-04-22 01:47:01

mandy jane
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Registered: 2010-09-23
Posts: 999

Re: Mandy Jane's Corner

Is the denominator 5 & 3 am I right?

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#1114 2013-04-22 01:47:54

SteveB
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Registered: 2013-03-07
Posts: 557

Re: Mandy Jane's Corner

We need to get the denominators to be same. How could we do that ?

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#1115 2013-04-22 01:49:52

mandy jane
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Registered: 2010-09-23
Posts: 999

Re: Mandy Jane's Corner

Is it 3x5 =15

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#1116 2013-04-22 01:51:00

SteveB
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Registered: 2013-03-07
Posts: 557

Re: Mandy Jane's Corner

Yes correct.

So what is (1/5) in fifteenths ?
What is (1/3) in fifteenths ?

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#1117 2013-04-22 01:56:30

mandy jane
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Registered: 2010-09-23
Posts: 999

Re: Mandy Jane's Corner

Not sure what to do?

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#1118 2013-04-22 02:00:00

SteveB
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Registered: 2013-03-07
Posts: 557

Re: Mandy Jane's Corner

(1 / 5 ) = (3 / 15)

The reason for that is that I have multiplied top and bottom by the same number.

In general it is possible to multiply the numerator and denominator by the same number and the fraction is still the same.
You could try drawing a diagram to show this. Let us say you had a square. You divide it into 5 bits which are equal in size.
That represents (1/5) now try dividing the square so that each of the five equal bits are divided into 3 bits.
You can use this to prove that (1/5) = (3/15)

What is (1/3) equal to ?

Last edited by SteveB (2013-04-22 02:01:25)

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#1119 2013-04-22 02:10:02

SteveB
Member
Registered: 2013-03-07
Posts: 557

Re: Mandy Jane's Corner

I could make up an image file to illustrate the division into 3 and 5 and 15, but it will take about 10 minutes to set up.

Do you want to just take my word for it or would you like an illustration ?

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#1120 2013-04-22 02:13:11

mandy jane
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Registered: 2010-09-23
Posts: 999

Re: Mandy Jane's Corner

Could you do an illustration for me please

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#1121 2013-04-22 02:18:46

SteveB
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Registered: 2013-03-07
Posts: 557

Re: Mandy Jane's Corner

Right hopefully the image will display alright.

I have drawn a rectangle. Imagine that the whole of the big rectangle represents the number 1

Now imagine that we have divided this big rectangle into 5 equal bits. Each of these is (1/5).

Now imagine that we have divided this big rectangle into 3 equal bits. Each of these is (1/3).

The very small bits made by dividing the big rectangle into 15 bits are each (1/15)

The fraction (1/5) is really 3 of the very small bits so (3/15)

The fraction (1/3) is really 5 of the very small bits so (5/15)

View Image: RectangleDivision.gif

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#1122 2013-04-22 02:24:56

mandy jane
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Registered: 2010-09-23
Posts: 999

Re: Mandy Jane's Corner

So is the answer 3/15 + 5/15 = 8/15 am I right?

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#1123 2013-04-22 02:25:55

SteveB
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Registered: 2013-03-07
Posts: 557

Re: Mandy Jane's Corner

Yes correct.

Do you want to have a go at Q3 ?

It was (1/3) + (5/6)

The answer is greater than one here, but the principle is the same.

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#1124 2013-04-22 02:33:41

mandy jane
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Registered: 2010-09-23
Posts: 999

Re: Mandy Jane's Corner

I have /18 am I right?

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#1125 2013-04-22 02:36:04

SteveB
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Registered: 2013-03-07
Posts: 557

Re: Mandy Jane's Corner

Yes you need to work out how many eighteenths each of the fractions is.

So  (1/3) = ( something / 18 )

and (5/6) = ( something else / 18 )

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