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#1 2012-11-18 10:49:05

MathsIsFun
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Trying a new Introduction to Derivatives

Trying a new "Introduction to Derivatives": Introduction to Derivatives

(To replace this one: Introduction to Derivatives)

(Note: the next step will be a page describing how to use the rules like power rule, chain rule etc)

What do you think of the new one? Have I gone too far in simplifying? Any suggestions?


"The physicists defer only to mathematicians, and the mathematicians defer only to God ..."  - Leon M. Lederman
 

#2 2012-11-18 11:13:32

bobbym
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Re: Trying a new Introduction to Derivatives

Hi;

Like it as it is. It is clear and two examples are fine.


In mathematics, you don't understand things. You just get used to them.
I have the result, but I do not yet know how to get it.
All physicists, and a good many quite respectable mathematicians are contemptuous about proof.
 

#3 2012-11-18 16:17:06

ganesh
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Re: Trying a new Introduction to Derivatives

Hi MathsIsFun,

The page Introduction to Derivatives is crystal clear. I don't think any further explanation is needed.


Character is who you are when no one is looking.
 

#4 2012-11-18 20:16:44

bob bundy
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Re: Trying a new Introduction to Derivatives

hi MathsIsFun


As ever, a great page.

Two suggestions:

(i) Make the diagram larger (see below).  The overlapping symbols make it a little confusing for a beginner.  I've taken the liberty of doctoring the diagram to show what I mean.  Really I would have liked to have a steeper curve, so that the points are more separated.

(ii) Rather than have the general rule first, then the examples afterwards, reverse this so that the reader gets to see some simple cases first, before learning the rule.

Hope that helps,  smile

Bob


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You cannot teach a man anything;  you can only help him find it within himself..........Galileo Galilei
 

#5 2012-11-18 22:18:56

MathsIsFun
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Re: Trying a new Introduction to Derivatives

Thanks guys.

I have also opted for f'(x) rather than dy/dx ... what are your thoughts on that?


"The physicists defer only to mathematicians, and the mathematicians defer only to God ..."  - Leon M. Lederman
 

#6 2012-11-18 22:47:09

bobbym
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Re: Trying a new Introduction to Derivatives

Hi MathsIsFun;

dy/dx is better when you want to handle the derivative as a fraction by resorting to differentials. For everything else use f '(x).


In mathematics, you don't understand things. You just get used to them.
I have the result, but I do not yet know how to get it.
All physicists, and a good many quite respectable mathematicians are contemptuous about proof.
 

#7 2012-11-18 23:02:20

bob bundy
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Re: Trying a new Introduction to Derivatives

I would suggest both, as students will meet both.  You might consider a section entitled Two Notations.

I think dy/dx fits better with your explanation technique.

Bob


You cannot teach a man anything;  you can only help him find it within himself..........Galileo Galilei
 

#8 2012-11-19 08:54:22

ganesh
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Re: Trying a new Introduction to Derivatives

bob bundy wrote:

I would suggest both, as students will meet both.  You might consider a section entitled Two Notations.

I think dy/dx fits better with your explanation technique.

Bob

I concur with the views.


Character is who you are when no one is looking.
 

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