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#101 2012-11-04 06:45:21

bob bundy
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Registered: 2010-06-20
Posts: 6,394

Re: Circles: Chords, Radii, and Arcs

You've made up 60 and 30 because that's what those angles look like.  But remember D could be anywhere on the circumference.

I've added a few more possibilities in different colours.

But in a way you're right because the angle at D is always ...... ?

Bob

View Image: zeefprotractor8.gif

You cannot teach a man anything;  you can only help him find it within himself..........Galileo Galilei

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#102 2012-11-04 06:48:13

zee-f
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Registered: 2011-05-12
Posts: 1,220

Re: Circles: Chords, Radii, and Arcs

when I measure the one you drew on the screen I get A is 30 degrees C is 70 D is 80


One, who adopts patience, will never be deprived of success though it may take a long time to reach him. Imam ali (as)<3

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#103 2012-11-04 06:49:29

zee-f
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Registered: 2011-05-12
Posts: 1,220

Re: Circles: Chords, Radii, and Arcs

I said #102 before seeing post #101


One, who adopts patience, will never be deprived of success though it may take a long time to reach him. Imam ali (as)<3

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#104 2012-11-04 06:54:59

zee-f
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Registered: 2011-05-12
Posts: 1,220

Re: Circles: Chords, Radii, and Arcs

is always a right angle right?


One, who adopts patience, will never be deprived of success though it may take a long time to reach him. Imam ali (as)<3

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#105 2012-11-04 06:56:35

bob bundy
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Registered: 2010-06-20
Posts: 6,394

Re: Circles: Chords, Radii, and Arcs

The thing is this.  There is a property that is always true for all circles and Q19 is testing it.

Amongst all your answers, you have said it correctly, but I don't want you to get it by luck, I want you to be sure.

So, looking at my multi-coloured diagram, what is angle D every time?

Bob


You cannot teach a man anything;  you can only help him find it within himself..........Galileo Galilei

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#106 2012-11-04 06:57:46

bob bundy
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Registered: 2010-06-20
Posts: 6,394

Re: Circles: Chords, Radii, and Arcs

Yes, that's it.  Excellent!

Bob


You cannot teach a man anything;  you can only help him find it within himself..........Galileo Galilei

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#107 2012-11-04 07:21:38

zee-f
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Registered: 2011-05-12
Posts: 1,220

Re: Circles: Chords, Radii, and Arcs

Thank you for the help!


One, who adopts patience, will never be deprived of success though it may take a long time to reach him. Imam ali (as)<3

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#108 2012-11-04 07:23:13

bob bundy
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Registered: 2010-06-20
Posts: 6,394

Re: Circles: Chords, Radii, and Arcs

You are very welcome.

By my reckoning only Q20 to go or have you done that?

Bob


You cannot teach a man anything;  you can only help him find it within himself..........Galileo Galilei

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#109 2012-11-04 08:48:51

zee-f
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Registered: 2011-05-12
Posts: 1,220

Re: Circles: Chords, Radii, and Arcs

No I did #20 and got it correct smile

I choose D

20. If line segment BC has a length of 24, and line segment AB has a length of 18, what is the radius of the circle?
A 18
B 38
C 6
D 15
E 4
F 29


One, who adopts patience, will never be deprived of success though it may take a long time to reach him. Imam ali (as)<3

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#110 2012-11-04 09:16:59

zee-f
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Registered: 2011-05-12
Posts: 1,220

Re: Circles: Chords, Radii, and Arcs

I started the next lesson about Circumference and Arc Length and I got all the 18/20
I am stuck on the 2 questions I got incorrect :

I choose C it was incorrect

What is the circumference of the circle if the radius is:

10. (x + y)pi

A (x+y)/7
B (x+y)/5
C(x+y)/1
D(x+y)/2
E (x+y)/3
F (x+y)/8

So I know the the formula for the circumference of a circle is 2(pi)(r)

So it would be 2(pi)*((x + y)pi) right? but then what do I do ?


I choose A it was incorrect I am still working on the correction
What is the length of the arc if
15. r=y n=x
A  x*y*pi/90
B x*y*pi/30
C x*y*pi/45
D x*y*pi/27
E  x*y*pi/180
F  x*y*pi/115


L =
(n/360)(2(PI)r) where L = length, n = degree measure of arc, and r = radius of the circle.

Last edited by zee-f (2012-11-04 09:18:58)


One, who adopts patience, will never be deprived of success though it may take a long time to reach him. Imam ali (as)<3

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#111 2012-11-04 10:47:37

bob bundy
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Registered: 2010-06-20
Posts: 6,394

Re: Circles: Chords, Radii, and Arcs

hi zee-f

Very well done for getting 18/20 at first attempt.  That's really good!

I can see where you went wrong here with Q15, so I'll do it first.

I choose A it was incorrect I am still working on the correction

What is the length of the arc if

15. r=y n=x
A  x*y*pi/90
B x*y*pi/30
C x*y*pi/45
D x*y*pi/27
E  x*y*pi/180
F  x*y*pi/115

With these problems I first work out the whole circumference, and then work out the fraction for the arc.

So cancel a 2 top and bottom and it's done.

Now for question 10.

What is the circumference of the circle if the radius is:

10. (x + y)pi

A (x+y)/7
B (x+y)/5
C(x+y)/1
D(x+y)/2
E (x+y)/3
F (x+y)/8

So I know the the formula for the circumference of a circle is 2(pi)(r)

So it would be 2(pi)*((x + y)pi) right? but then what do I do ?

What you have done is exactly right so something else is wrong here.

If the radius has a pi in it,   the circumference will collect another,  giving a pi squared.  None of the answers looks right.

If it's a mis-print I can make sense of it.  Try this:

What is the radius of the circle if the circumference is:

10. (x + y)pi

A (x+y)/7
B (x+y)/5
C(x+y)/1
D(x+y)/2
E (x+y)/3
F (x+y)/8

This way round it makes sense and one of the answers works.

Bob


You cannot teach a man anything;  you can only help him find it within himself..........Galileo Galilei

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#112 2012-11-06 08:09:01

zee-f
Member
Registered: 2011-05-12
Posts: 1,220

Re: Circles: Chords, Radii, and Arcs

Hi Bob,


15. r=y n=x

#15- My new answer is (E) x*y*pi/180

I pretended that x was 1 and said that
(1/360 * 2= 1/180) then put the x back and multiplied. I get x*y*pi/180.

#10- OK sense I know that c=π*d and D= c/π
I am going to divide the circumference by PI So I will get(x+y)π/π , and
π/π = 1 so I am left with (x+y) and to get the radius I am going to divide by two and my answer is (x+y)/2.

Thank you,


One, who adopts patience, will never be deprived of success though it may take a long time to reach him. Imam ali (as)<3

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#113 2012-11-06 09:54:21

bob bundy
Moderator
Registered: 2010-06-20
Posts: 6,394

Re: Circles: Chords, Radii, and Arcs

hi zee-f

Oh, well done.  I'm so pleased.  Both correct in my opinion.  smile

Bob


You cannot teach a man anything;  you can only help him find it within himself..........Galileo Galilei

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