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#26 2012-07-30 21:04:44

Ashok123
Guest

Re: 1=2 proof

dreamalot wrote:

Hey, swim is new here and is wondering if someone could direct him to the classic 1=2 proof? Thanks.

a=a

=
(since, multiply both side with "a")

-
=
-
    (since,
-
=(a+b)(a-b))
(a-a)(a+a)=a(a-a)
a+a=a
2a=a
2=1

#27 2012-07-30 21:17:47

anonimnystefy
Real Member
From: The Foundation
Registered: 2011-05-23
Posts: 15,657

Re: 1=2 proof

Hi Ashok123

Your steps aren't algebraicly correct. How did you get that a^2-a^2=a(a-a) ?

Last edited by anonimnystefy (2012-07-30 21:18:19)


“Here lies the reader who will never open this book. He is forever dead.

“Taking a new step, uttering a new word, is what people fear most.” ― Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

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#28 2012-07-31 16:44:26

cmowla
Member
Registered: 2012-06-14
Posts: 57

Re: 1=2 proof

anonimnystefy wrote:

Hi Ashok123

Your steps aren't algebraicly correct. How did you get that a^2-a^2=a(a-a) ?

The only flawed step was when he divided by

.  Everything else is correct.

Last edited by cmowla (2012-07-31 16:45:43)

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#29 2012-07-31 23:33:59

anonimnystefy
Real Member
From: The Foundation
Registered: 2011-05-23
Posts: 15,657

Re: 1=2 proof

Hi cmowla

Yes, you are right.


“Here lies the reader who will never open this book. He is forever dead.

“Taking a new step, uttering a new word, is what people fear most.” ― Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

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#30 2012-08-08 14:37:52

careless25
Real Member
Registered: 2008-07-24
Posts: 555

Re: 1=2 proof

Heres an infinite series "proof" that shows 0 = 1

0 = 0 + 0 + 0 + 0 + · · ·
= (1 − 1) + (1 − 1) + (1 − 1) + (1 − 1) + · · ·
= 1 − 1 + 1 − 1 + 1 − 1 + 1 − 1 + · · ·
= 1 + (−1 + 1) + (−1 + 1) + (−1 + 1) + · · ·
= 1 + 0 + 0 + 0 + · · ·
= 1


"Legend has it that, around 1703, in letters to contemporary mathematicians, an Italian monk by the name of Guido Grandi (often called Guido Ubaldus) presented this as proof of the existence of God, since it suggested that the universe could have been created out of nothing! What he actually meant isn't clear, but we do know that the brightest minds of the day were unsure how to explain what the problem was. Leibniz at least recognized that the problem was in the ____ line above;"

I left it blank intentionally wink

This is copied from my Calculus prof notes, he showed is this "proof" in class.

Last edited by careless25 (2012-08-08 14:42:23)

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