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#1 2005-12-04 10:49:12

math_phys_bio
Member
Registered: 2005-12-04
Posts: 2

math/physics relation

what could be the relation between these two? math is abstract and physics is part of the physical world.

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#2 2005-12-04 11:47:05

ryos
Member
Registered: 2005-08-04
Posts: 394

Re: math/physics relation

Physics uses math to model reality. Some models work better than others. In that sense both are abstract, and both are real: physics is abstract until it accurately describes reality, and math is abstract until it is used to model real situations.

Don't get me started on Physics...(ignore air resistance and friction, my eye. Teach me something I can actually use, and then I might be interested.)


El que pega primero pega dos veces.

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#3 2005-12-04 12:10:08

Ricky
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Registered: 2005-12-04
Posts: 3,791

Re: math/physics relation

"ignore air resistance and friction, my eye. Teach me something I can actually use, and then I might be interested."

Friction is related to speed.  This makes things very complicated, because friction changes the speed and the speed change the friction.  This lead to differential equations such as:

3y' + 5y = cos(x), solve for y, and it can't be in terms of y'.

And that's a simple one!  The problem with equations like this is it takes a full understanding of integrals and derivatives to solve (basic calculus).  This is why they aren't taught at a high school level.  But as soon as you get the advanced math, physics becomes frighteningly accurate (as well as difficult).

Last edited by Ricky (2005-12-04 12:10:59)


"In the real world, this would be a problem.  But in mathematics, we can just define a place where this problem doesn't exist.  So we'll go ahead and do that now..."

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#4 2005-12-04 12:27:08

ryos
Member
Registered: 2005-08-04
Posts: 394

Re: math/physics relation

I'm in a college physics course that requires calculus.


El que pega primero pega dos veces.

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#5 2005-12-05 08:43:34

irspow
Member
Registered: 2005-11-24
Posts: 455

Re: math/physics relation

You can't learn physics without calculus.  You would just be memorizing formulas otherwise.  Then you would only be able to solve problems that have already been figured out.  It would be like an "artist" who could only paint one picture again and again.

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