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#1 2009-11-20 05:30:08

Identity
Member
Registered: 2007-04-18
Posts: 934

graviton shielding?

Just a random idea I was pondering...

If we place a charge q in a vacuum and measure it, the measured charge is less than the actual charge because the vacuum acts like a dielectric - electron/positron pairs are spontaneously created and annihilated, and their presence reduces the observed electric field.

What if a similar mechanism occurred with gravity? What if gravitons/antigravitons spontaneously appear and annihilate, acting as a 'dielectric' material and 'shielding' the source of gravity, so that the observed gravitational field is less than what it should be?
Could this explain why gravity is so weak (of course the shielding would have to be a lot stronger than for electromagnetism)?

Last edited by Identity (2009-11-20 05:33:35)

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#2 2009-11-20 06:06:48

LQ
Real Member
Registered: 2006-12-04
Posts: 1,285

Re: graviton shielding?

that must be true, and hence it can be calculated that a gravityfield is stronger far out from the mass since there they do not collide as often. It can also be proven how big they are, what energy they have and what momentum because of the declining of force.

Last edited by LQ (2009-11-20 06:15:09)


I see clearly now, the universe have the black dots, Thus I am on my way of inventing this remedy...

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#3 2009-11-20 06:20:52

LQ
Real Member
Registered: 2006-12-04
Posts: 1,285

Re: graviton shielding?

New question; can antigravitons destroy mithril?
that would effect gravity either way you sum or subtract to the gravitones "biosphere" in whatever celestial object has the proper amount of gravitones of the right kind.

Last edited by LQ (2009-11-20 06:29:27)


I see clearly now, the universe have the black dots, Thus I am on my way of inventing this remedy...

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