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#1 2006-07-04 14:15:30

xxxq
Member
Registered: 2006-07-04
Posts: 2

Differentiating tan(x)

How do you differentiate tan(x) using the chain rule?

I can do it using the product rule and quotient rule, but I can't figure out how to do it with the chain rule.

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#2 2006-07-04 14:32:18

Ricky
Moderator
Registered: 2005-12-04
Posts: 3,791

Re: Differentiating tan(x)

Are you sure you don't mean the quotient rule?

Remeber that tan(x) = sin(x) / cos(x).


"In the real world, this would be a problem.  But in mathematics, we can just define a place where this problem doesn't exist.  So we'll go ahead and do that now..."

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#3 2006-07-04 14:40:39

xxxq
Member
Registered: 2006-07-04
Posts: 2

Re: Differentiating tan(x)

I definately mean the chain rule, by multiplying du/dx and dy/du to get dy/dx,

where I think u = 1/cos(x)

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#4 2006-07-04 15:33:09

Ricky
Moderator
Registered: 2005-12-04
Posts: 3,791

Re: Differentiating tan(x)

The chain rule is:

f(g(x))' = f'(g(x)) * g'(x)

Which only makes sense when you are doing functions like

sin(e^x)

or

tan(cos(x))

In other words, when you have a function inside of a function.  I don't think the chain rule will help you with tan(x).


"In the real world, this would be a problem.  But in mathematics, we can just define a place where this problem doesn't exist.  So we'll go ahead and do that now..."

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