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  Discussion about math, puzzles, games and fun.   Useful symbols: √ ∞ ≠ ≤ ≥ ≈ ⇒ ∈ Δ θ ∴ ∑ ∫ π -

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#1 2006-05-14 23:38:14

renjer
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Lagrange

Use Lagrange multipliers to find the minimum distance from the point (5,5,4) to the paraboloid z=4-x^2-y^2.

I know a lot about Lagrange multipliers, they're quite easy, but the problem is, how do you find the distance from a point in space to a surface?

#2 2006-05-15 00:20:25

ganesh
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Re: Lagrange

I don't know about Lagrange multipliers and read about it here.

If your problem requires finding the distance between a point and a surface, the distance required must be the shortest distance to the point from normal to the surface!


Character is who you are when no one is looking.

#3 2006-05-15 22:41:20

renjer
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Re: Lagrange

Then how can I relate that to Lagrange multipliers? I know there is supposed to be 2 equations f(x,y,z) and g(x,y,z) but now I don't know which two equations can I use.

#4 2006-05-16 00:37:32

George,Y
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Re: Lagrange

you can set up a distance function,
maximize it or its square under the constraint z=4-x^2-y^2.


X'(y-Xβ)=0

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