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#1 2012-10-22 15:51:25

Wink
Guest

Signum function

What will be sgn(a+bi)?

#2 2012-10-22 16:21:44

bobbym
Administrator

Online

Re: Signum function

Hi Wink;


In mathematics, you don't understand things. You just get used to them.
I have the result, but I do not yet know how to get it.
All physicists, and a good many quite respectable mathematicians are contemptuous about proof.

#3 2012-10-22 16:56:11

Wink
Guest

Re: Signum function

Is the csgn(x) function related to sgn(x)?

#4 2012-10-22 23:08:33

bobbym
Administrator

Online

Re: Signum function

Hi;

The csgn function is defined like this:


In mathematics, you don't understand things. You just get used to them.
I have the result, but I do not yet know how to get it.
All physicists, and a good many quite respectable mathematicians are contemptuous about proof.

#5 2012-10-23 00:59:38

Wink
Guest

Re: Signum function

If I want to find sign of complex number what should I use, sgn(z) or csgn(z)

#6 2012-10-23 02:36:21

bobbym
Administrator

Online

Re: Signum function

Hi;

I would use the sgn(z).


In mathematics, you don't understand things. You just get used to them.
I have the result, but I do not yet know how to get it.
All physicists, and a good many quite respectable mathematicians are contemptuous about proof.

#7 2012-10-23 02:38:28

Wink
Guest

Re: Signum function

Then what is csgn for?

#8 2012-10-23 02:42:33

bobbym
Administrator

Online

Re: Signum function

Hi;

The guys at Waterloo say:

The csgn function is used to determine in which half-plane ("left" or "right") the complex-valued expression or number x lies.


In mathematics, you don't understand things. You just get used to them.
I have the result, but I do not yet know how to get it.
All physicists, and a good many quite respectable mathematicians are contemptuous about proof.

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