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#1 Re: Help Me ! » area of polygons review » 2017-10-18 09:00:00

8.  height = 19.8 cm
b1 = ___26.2_____
b2 = 14.4 cm
area = 401.94 cm2




9. height = 23 mm
b1 = 23 mm
b2 = ______23__
area = 529 mm2

10. height = __10______
b1 = 20 cm
b2 = 21 cm
area = 205 cm2

11. height = 28.9 m
b1 = 26.9 m
b2 = __28.9______
area = 806.31 m^2

12. If the area of a parallelogram is 690.84 m^2 and the height is 20.2 m, what is the length of the base?

34.2 m

13. If the base of a rectangle is 28 cm and the area is 588 cm^2, what is the height of the rectangle?

21 cm

14. If the height of a rectangle is 26.1 m and the base is 17.3 m, what is the area of the rectangle?

451.53m

15. If the height of a parallelogram is 34 cm and the base is 15 cm, what is the area of the parallelogram?

510

19. What is the area of this rectangle?



78 


I need help showing work I did most of it on a calulator.

#2 Help Me ! » area of polygons review » 2017-10-18 08:49:52

taylorn5683
Replies: 2

Calculate the area for each of the polygons below. If you do not know an equation to use, divide the polygon into other shapes to determine the area.

1.  An equilateral triangle with a side of 1 inch

2. A square with a side of 2 feet

3. A regular pentagon with a side of 3 centimeters

4. A regular hexagon with a side of 10 cm

5. A regular heptagon with a side of 7 inches

6. A trapezoid where the height is 18 cm, base 1 = 16 cm and b2 = 8 cm.

7. A trapezoid where the height = 7 mm, base 1 = 26 mm and base 2 = 9 mm.

Fill in the missing information for the following trapezoids:

8.  height = 19.8 cm
b1 = ________
b2 = 14.4 cm
area = 401.94 cm2




9. height = 23 mm
b1 = 23 mm
b2 = ________
area = 529 mm2

10. height = ________
b1 = 20 cm
b2 = 21 cm
area = 205 cm2

11. height = 28.9 m
b1 = 26.9 m
b2 = ________
area = 806.31 m^2

12. If the area of a parallelogram is 690.84 m^2 and the height is 20.2 m, what is the length of the base?

13. If the base of a rectangle is 28 cm and the area is 588 cm^2, what is the height of the rectangle?

14. If the height of a rectangle is 26.1 m and the base is 17.3 m, what is the area of the rectangle?

15. If the height of a parallelogram is 34 cm and the base is 15 cm, what is the area of the parallelogram?

16. What is the area of a parallelogram with height 26 cm, base 16 cm, and side length 28 cm?

17. What is the area of a regular octagon with a side of 6 cm?




18. What is the area of this polygon?


                                       
ls_XF    =    53 mm    ls_XV    =    72 mm    ls_VR    =    16 mm
ls_FB    =    31 mm    ls_BT    =    31 mm    ls_EU    =    47 mm
ls_UL    =    31 mm    ls_TL    =    88 mm    ls_DE    =    16 mm
ls_RM    =    70 mm    ls_MC    =    21 mm    ls_DC    =    70 mm


19. What is the area of this rectangle?



20. What is the area of this polygon?

#3 Help Me ! » Area of Circles and Sectors » 2017-10-10 05:10:44

taylorn5683
Replies: 1

I've answered all of these twice but I'm doing something wrong and keep confusing my self I need to get this turned in asap. please help...

What is the area of the circle if the radius is:

2. SQRT(3)

4. 6x

What is the radius if the area of the circle is:

7. 4x^2(PI)


11. (9/16)PI

12. 25y^2(PI)

13. 16z^2(PI)

14. t^2(PI)

15. t^2(PI)


What is the area of the sector if the radius is 6 and the degree measure is:


16. 26

17. 30

18. 50

19. 90

20. 120

#4 Help Me ! » Circumferences and Arc Length » 2017-09-13 06:56:37

taylorn5683
Replies: 1

What is the circumference of the circle if the radius is:


4. 3x-4
I tried and tired and there are no like terms so it wont work but my teacher says differant.



What is the radius if the circumference is:

6.  30x(pi)

radius is 4.8x


7. 4x-10pi
4x-31.4


8. (5/2)pi

1.24 Pi

9. 14pi
the radius is 2.2


10. (x + y)pi

  PI  x+PI y


she won't explain what is wrong or how to do it she says just use formula but I am confused with the variable I think.

#6 Re: Help Me ! » triangles please help » 2017-05-11 14:51:40

No I am sorry I did Not but now that I have, I really need help I have been stuck on this for a while and I just don't Understand I a work a Full time job and I have tried to work on it but I need some help Because I havent been haveing as much time to think about it. So if you don't mind helping me I would appericate it. I will work with you to help figure out the answers.
Thank you.

#7 Help Me ! » Introduction to Trigonometry (a.k.a. sohcatoha) need help understand » 2017-05-11 03:15:42

taylorn5683
Replies: 1

For angle x:
http://www.sc.whitmoreschool.org/sec/students/classes/geometry/lesson11_files/image5A9.JPG

1. What is the sin?

2. What is the cos?

3. What is the tan?

4. What is the sec?

5. What is the csc?

6. What is the cot?

Still looking at the image above, one angle is angle x, and another is the right angle (90o). Since the angles in a triangle add up to 180o, the other angle will be 90-x. For the unlabeled angle above, the angle 90-x:

7. What is the sin?

8. What is the cos?

9. What is the tan?

10. What is the sec?

11. What is the csc?

12. What is the cot?

13. If the cos of an angle is .75, what is the csc?

14. If the cot of an angle is 7/8, what is the tan?

You have collected data on several buildings.  For each building, you are given the angle of the line of sight up to the top of the building, and the distance to the building.  Calculate the height of each building.



http://www.sc.whitmoreschool.org/sec/students/classes/geometry/lesson11_files/fig0901.JPG

15.  Building 1 Angle 71o Distance 20 meters




16. Building 2 Angle 45o Distance 10 meters

17. Building 3 Angle 20o Distance 15 meters

18. Building 4 Angle 5o Distance 47.22 meters

19. Building 5 Angle 1o Distance 500 meters

20. You have climbed to the top of a tall tree. When you get to the top, you use your clinometer to discover that the angle between the tree and the line of sight to your red lunchbox is 30o. You know you left the lunchbox 20 meters from the base of the tree. How tall is the tree? (Careful! This is a little different than the building problems!)


http://www.sc.whitmoreschool.org/sec/students/classes/geometry/lesson11_files/fig0904.JPG

please help

#8 Re: Help Me ! » hellllllppppppp please been stuck » 2017-05-11 03:00:59

For questions 1 through 4 your complex statement is "Dogs are mammals."



1.  What is p?

Something is a dog

2. What is q?

something is a mammal.

3. "If something is not a dog, then it is not a mammal" is the:

contrapositive

4. ~q => ~p for this statement is:

If it is not a mammal, then it is not a dog.

On 5 through 7 your complex statement is "If x2>10, then x>0."



5.  "If x > 0, then x^2 > 10" is the:

converse

6. "If x is not > 0, then x^2 is not > 10" is the:

contrapositive

7. "x = - 4" would be an example of a

Counterexample


On 8 though 10, the complex statement is "Cars can take you everywhere."

8.  "If it is everywhere, then a car can take you" is the:

9. "If it is not everywhere, then a car cannot take you" is the:

10. "A car can't take you to the moon" would be the:

For problems 11 through 12, your complex statement is "Small pinpricks of light in the night sky are stars."


11. The converse of the statement is:

12. "Small pinpricks of light in the night sky might be satellites" is a(n)

For problems 13 through 14 your complex statement is "Baseball players are athletes."

13.  Which of the following is accurate? Explain your reasoning for choosing your response.


A. The inverse of the statement is "If someone is a baseball player then someone is an athlete."
B. The statement is "If someone is an athlete, then they are a baseball player."
C.The statement can never be true.
D. Baseball players all have great teeth and gums.
E. The inverse of the statement is not true.
F. The converse is: "Joey is a baseball player, and he is not an athlete."

14. What is q?

For problems 15 through 20, create Venn Diagrams to help you solve the problems. These are not easy diagrams, take your time and think through this carefully.

15.  500 students are enrolled in at least two of these three classes: Math, English, and History.  170 are enrolled in both Math and English, 150 are enrolled in both History and English, and 300 are enrolled in Math and History.  How many of the 500 students are enrolled in all three?


Hints on 15 (highlight the following paragraph with your mouse to see them, they are in the form of questions you'll need to answer):
You aren't meant to find out how many students are in the individual courses. How many students are you supposed to have counted? How many wound up being counted? What does the overage mean? How many times too many was a student counted if he was in all three classes?

16. 30 people are having lunch at my house.  16 of them want salads, 16 of them prefer pasta, and 11 of them want steak.  5 say they want to have both salad and steak, and of these, 3 want pasta as well.  5 want only steak, and 8 want only pasta.  How many people want salad only?

Make a Venn Diagram from the following information to answer questions 17 through 20:

25 students played soccer

4 boys played soccer and baseball

3 girls played soccer and baseball

10 boys played baseball

4 girls played baseball

9 students played tennis

3 boys played soccer and tennis

3 girls played soccer and tennis

3 boys played baseball and tennis

1 girl played baseball and tennis

1 boy played all three sports

1 girl played all three sports







Hints on the diagram (highlight the following paragraph with your mouse to see them):

17.  How many students played soccer, but not baseball or tennis? Notice that the counts don't make sense as they are, because they're all inclusive. The soccer count includes every who plays soccer, even the students in the soccer and baseball, soccer and tennis, and the all three sport counts. The count for soccer and baseball includes the students who play all three sports. So you'll need to correct from the inside outward...first subtract the boy and girl who play all three sports from all the other counts, then subtract the dual-sport counts from the single sport counts.

Put another way, this is like the gecko problem--the entire soccer circle including the soccer and baseball students and the soccer and tennis students and the students who play soccer and baseball and tennis, will add up to 25.






18. How many students played soccer and baseball, but not tennis?

19. How many students played just one of the three sports?

20. How many girls played only baseball?


02-17-2017 23:49:34

Thanks for the partial post


02-23-2017 13:32:08

On 8 though 10, the complex statement is "Cars can take you everywhere."

8.  "If it is everywhere, then a car can take you" is the:

converse

9. "If it is not everywhere, then a car cannot take you" is the:

contrapositive

10. "A car can't take you to the moon" would be the:

counterexample

For problems 11 through 12, your complex statement is "Small pinpricks of light in the night sky are stars."


11. The converse of the statement is:

The night sky of stars, are small pinpricks of light.

12. "Small pinpricks of light in the night sky might be satellites" is a(n)

counter exmple.



I need help with 13 and 14


02-23-2017 17:13:01

Submission FB

Taylor,

Take another look at #3, 4, What questiosn do you have about #13 and 14?  The original statement that goes with these questions is in the directions.   Don't forget to complete #15-20

Ms C


03-22-2017 19:43:03

3. "If something is not a dog, then it is not a mammal" is the:

inverse

4. ~q => ~p for this statement is

:means that if p is true, then q must also be true. The statement “p implies q” is also written “if p then q” or sometimes “q if p.” Statement p is called the premise of the implication and q is called the conclusion.


03-23-2017 22:03:44

1st revision FB

Taylor,

You have already used a partial post for this lesson. 

#3     right

#4     so what kind of statement is formed by this manipulation of p and q?  Inverse? Converse? Contrapositive?

#13 -20 still need to be completed   

Ms C

#9 Help Me ! » hellllllppppppp please been stuck » 2017-05-11 02:59:52

taylorn5683
Replies: 2

For questions 1 through 4 your complex statement is "Dogs are mammals."



1.  What is p?

2. What is q?

3. "If something is not a dog, then it is not a mammal" is the:

4. ~q => ~p for this statement is:

On 5 through 7 your complex statement is "If x2>10, then x>0."



5.  "If x > 0, then x^2 > 10" is the:

6. "If x is not > 0, then x^2 is not > 10" is the:

7. "x = - 4" would be an example of a

On 8 though 10, the complex statement is "Cars can take you everywhere."

8.  "If it is everywhere, then a car can take you" is the:

9. "If it is not everywhere, then a car cannot take you" is the:

10. "A car can't take you to the moon" would be the:

For problems 11 through 12, your complex statement is "Small pinpricks of light in the night sky are stars."


11. The converse of the statement is:

12. "Small pinpricks of light in the night sky might be satellites" is a(n)

For problems 13 through 14 your complex statement is "Baseball players are athletes."

13.  Which of the following is accurate? Explain your reasoning for choosing your response.


A. The inverse of the statement is "If someone is a baseball player then someone is an athlete."
B. The statement is "If someone is an athlete, then they are a baseball player."
C.The statement can never be true.
D. Baseball players all have great teeth and gums.
E. The inverse of the statement is not true.
F. The converse is: "Joey is a baseball player, and he is not an athlete."

14. What is q?

For problems 15 through 20, create Venn Diagrams to help you solve the problems. These are not easy diagrams, take your time and think through this carefully.

15.  500 students are enrolled in at least two of these three classes: Math, English, and History.  170 are enrolled in both Math and English, 150 are enrolled in both History and English, and 300 are enrolled in Math and History.  How many of the 500 students are enrolled in all three?


Hints on 15 (highlight the following paragraph with your mouse to see them, they are in the form of questions you'll need to answer):
You aren't meant to find out how many students are in the individual courses. How many students are you supposed to have counted? How many wound up being counted? What does the overage mean? How many times too many was a student counted if he was in all three classes?

16. 30 people are having lunch at my house.  16 of them want salads, 16 of them prefer pasta, and 11 of them want steak.  5 say they want to have both salad and steak, and of these, 3 want pasta as well.  5 want only steak, and 8 want only pasta.  How many people want salad only?

Make a Venn Diagram from the following information to answer questions 17 through 20:

25 students played soccer

4 boys played soccer and baseball

3 girls played soccer and baseball

10 boys played baseball

4 girls played baseball

9 students played tennis

3 boys played soccer and tennis

3 girls played soccer and tennis

3 boys played baseball and tennis

1 girl played baseball and tennis

1 boy played all three sports

1 girl played all three sports







Hints on the diagram (highlight the following paragraph with your mouse to see them):


17.  How many students played soccer, but not baseball or tennis? Notice that the counts don't make sense as they are, because they're all inclusive. The soccer count includes every who plays soccer, even the students in the soccer and baseball, soccer and tennis, and the all three sport counts. The count for soccer and baseball includes the students who play all three sports. So you'll need to correct from the inside outward...first subtract the boy and girl who play all three sports from all the other counts, then subtract the dual-sport counts from the single sport counts.

Put another way, this is like the gecko problem--the entire soccer circle including the soccer and baseball students and the soccer and tennis students and the students who play soccer and baseball and tennis, will add up to 25.



18. How many students played soccer and baseball, but not tennis?

19. How many students played just one of the three sports?

20. How many girls played only baseball?

#10 Help Me ! » triangles please help » 2017-05-11 02:57:04

taylorn5683
Replies: 4

Exercises:
Note: we'll need some definitions about some particular kinds of angles: Right angle: 90o Acute angle: <90o Obtuse angle: >90o


1.  How many right angles can there be in a triangle?
answer: one right angle
correct

2. How many acute angles can there be in a triangle?

answer: two acute angles. wrong!

3. How many obtuse angles can there be in a triangle?

answer: one obtuse angle correct
4. What is the minimum number of right angles there can be?

5. What is the minimum number of acute angles there can be?

6. What is the minimum number of obtuse angles there can be?

7. Each set of numbers below represents the lengths of three line segments.
Which set represent line segments that could be connected to form a triangle? Give the reasoning or show your work to support your choice:

A. (1, 2, 3)
B. (3, 4, 5)
C.(1, 10, 100)
D. (1, 2, 5)
E. (1, 3, 4)
F. (1, 20, 100)




8. Each set of numbers below represents the lengths of three line segments.
Which set represent line segments that could be connected to form a triangle? Give the reasoning or show your work to support your choice

A. (3, 5, 7)
B. (3, 4, 8)
C.(1, 4, 6)
D. (1, 3, 5)
E. (5, 6, 11)
F. (1, 10, 20)




9. Each set of numbers below represents the lengths of three line segments.
Which set represent line segments that could be connected to form a triangle?  Give the reasoning or show your work to support your choice

A. (2, 2, 5)
B. (5, 4, 1)
C.(5, 10, 15)
D. (7, 10, 16)
E. (2, 3, 5)
F. (5, 10, 25)




10. Each set of numbers below represents the lengths of three line segments.
Which set represent line segments that could be connected to form a triangle?  Give the reasoning or show your work to support your choice

A. (3, 1, 2)
B. (3, 2, 5)
C.(1, 15, 100)
D. (40, 5, 40)
E. (30, 4, 10)
F. (20, 30, 50)




11. Each set of numbers below represents the measures of three angles.
Which set represent angle measures that could be found in a triangle?  Give the reasoning or show your work to support your choice

A. (30o, 40o, 30o)
B. (42o, 18o, 130o)
C.(10o, 15o, 100o)
D. (40o, 5o, 40o)
E. (60o, 45o, 75o)
F. (20o, 40o, 50o)




12. Each set of numbers below represents the measures of three angles.
Which set represent angle measures that could be found in a triangle?  Give the reasoning or show your work to support your choice

A. (30o, 100o, 20o)
B. (36o, 42o, 65o)
C.(30o, 57o, 30o)
D. (44o, 63o, 73o)
E. (67o, 41o, 62o)
F. (29o, 131o, 40o)


13. I have a triangle with sides of 3, 4, and 5, and angles of 30o and 60o. Which of the following would be congruent to it? (You will need to use what you've learned about triangles and angle / side relations, as well as your knowledge of the rules of congruence to fill in the gaps and answer the question. Sketches may be helpful.) Give the reasoning or show your work to support your choice:

A. a triangle with angles of 30o, 60o, and 90o
B. an angle of 90o
C.a triangle with sides of 6, 8, and 10
D. a triangle with sides of 3 and 4
E. a triangle with a side measuring 4, next an angle of 90o, and next a side measuring 3
F. a triangle with a side measuring 3, next an angle of 60o, and next a side measuring 4


.

14. I have a triangle with sides of 1 and a side of SQRT(2), with an angle of 45o and an angle of 90o. Which of the following would be congruent to it? (You will need to use what you've learned about triangles and angle / side relations, as well as your knowledge of the rules of congruence to fill in the gaps and answer the question. Sketches may be helpful.). Give the reasoning or show your work to support your choice

A. a triangle with a side of 1, then an angle of 90o, and a side of 1
B. a triangle with a side of 1, then an angle of 90o, then a side of SQRT(2)
C.a triangle with the angles 45o, 45o, 90o
D. a triangle with sides of 1 and 1
E. a triangle with a side of 1, then an angle of 45o, then a side of 1
F. a triangle with an angle of 90o, then a side of SQRT(2), then an angle of 45o


.

15. Which of the following polygons are congruent?






16. Which of the following shapes are congruent?






17. We are trying to measure the height of a building. We have a 1-meter long stick. When we set it on the ground, its shadow is 3 meters long. When we measure the shadow of the building, it is 57 meters long. How high is the building?

18. I can look out my window and see the top of a television transmitter tower. On the map, I see that it is 2 miles away. I read somewhere that the tower is 500 feet tall. As I look at the tower, I see that the very top leaves of a tree sometimes get in the way of the top of the tower. The tree is 50 yards from where I sit. How tall is the tree?

19. Here are two triangles. I am trying to measure the area of triangle ABC. The formula for area of a triangle is

base*height/2.


I know the base, but I need to find the height. I know the top of triangle ABC is directly above a point 4.5 units from point A. I also know that


What is the triangle's height?

20. The sun is shining and I am on a hill. I want to measure the height of a tree downhill from me, using my one-meter stick, and a tape measure for measuring shadows. What do I do to take the slope of the hill into account?

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