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Topic review (newest first)

Atiq
2013-11-23 01:31:39

pi man wrote:

dividend / divisor = quotient with a remainder

Just do your division as if both numbers (dividend and divisor) where positive.   When you're done, if both numbers were positive, the quotient is positive.   If both numbers were negative, the quotient is positive.   If one (and only one) of the two is negative, then the quotient  is negative.   

So -45 / 7 would be -6 with a remainder of 3.   Actually, now that you brought it up, it probably should be a remainder of -3 since [quotient * divisor + remainder = dividend].   

-6 * 7 + (-3) = 45.   

Or if the remainder is always supposed to be positive, the answer could be -7 with a remainder of 4:   -7 * 7 + 4 = 45.    Bottom line is I thought I knew the answer but I guess I don't.   It's been too long since I studied that I guess.

dizzyrofloldizzy
SINCE:
           dividend = quotient (multiplier * divisor) + remainder

such that
              dividend > quotient

so remainder = 4

krassi_holmz
2006-09-11 05:07:08

Oh sorry.
Now I misunderstood.
smile wink smile

mikau
2006-09-11 03:58:58

Yes I know, Krassi, I was just trying to explain to Ricky what my question WAS.

krassi_holmz
2006-09-11 03:14:48

I gave you a formula!


mikau
2006-09-11 01:10:01

I think what modulus does with negatives. I mean, with positves you use integer division.   5%2. How many times does 2 fit into five? Twice. So 2 * 2 = 4, subtract 4 from 5 and you get the remainder 1, which is the returned value from this expression. So I can figure out 5%2 without using the computer. How do I figure out 5%-2 or -5%2? That was my question.

Ricky
2006-09-10 10:57:39

Ah, maybe I misunderstood.  Mikau, are you looking to find out how the computer implements modulus with negatives or what modulus does with negatives?

krassi_holmz
2006-09-10 06:24:40

So I've helped!
VVV
o_O
LLLJ

mikau
2006-09-10 06:22:21

thanks, krassi!

krassi_holmz
2006-09-10 06:19:44
krassi_holmz
2006-09-10 06:13:41

For this you will need a definition of module over the reals.
For example:


But this depends. You should see some java help for the java %.

mikau
2006-09-10 06:07:10

so is anyone going to tell me how? Lol.

I'm not interested in how the modulus operation works physically, but how I figure out the answer to the problems mathematically so I know where I can use them in my program or what they are doing when they appear.

krassi_holmz
2006-09-10 05:25:04

Ricky wrote:

When programming in Java, or really any high level language, it's not so much important to understand how things work.  That only starts to make sense when you get down to the assembly level.

I don't agree. If you have some very big messy program, for example, and if it uses many modulus in it, and if it doesn't do what it's supposed to do, then you should know what's happening around the %, because the mistake may be there. If you don't know, you might pass the error, without noticyng it and this can cost you a big headache. dizzy

Ricky
2006-09-09 15:18:36

When programming in Java, or really any high level language, it's not so much important to understand how things work.  That only starts to make sense when you get down to the assembly level.

mikau
2006-09-09 14:22:24

yeah me too. Well actually I never studied this particular thing.

pi man
2006-09-09 14:08:22

dividend / divisor = quotient with a remainder

Just do your division as if both numbers (dividend and divisor) where positive.   When you're done, if both numbers were positive, the quotient is positive.   If both numbers were negative, the quotient is positive.   If one (and only one) of the two is negative, then the quotient  is negative.   

So -45 / 7 would be -6 with a remainder of 3.   Actually, now that you brought it up, it probably should be a remainder of -3 since [quotient * divisor + remainder = dividend].   

-6 * 7 + (-3) = 45.   

Or if the remainder is always supposed to be positive, the answer could be -7 with a remainder of 4:   -7 * 7 + 4 = 45.    Bottom line is I thought I knew the answer but I guess I don't.   It's been too long since I studied that I guess.

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