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  Discussion about math, puzzles, games and fun.   Useful symbols: √ ∞ ≠ ≤ ≥ ≈ ⇒ ∈ Δ θ ∴ ∑ ∫ π -

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Topic review (newest first)

mathstudent2000
2013-08-11 06:26:09

so i guess it is computer marked

mathstudent2000
2013-08-11 06:22:37

yeah its for my hw on aops

bob bundy
2013-08-11 06:15:57

If a student hands in work on a sheet of paper I can view all the working and award marks for good maths.  Some on-line courses only want answers that can be checked by a computer.  So it is necessary to submit single letters (if multi-choice) or numbers so that the program can do an exact comparison.  It's easy for the course administrators but somewhat poor at detecting student misunderstandings.

eg.

Let's say you thought k was 9/4 and the second answer -9/4

A human marker could see you had misunderstood about area scale factors, but a computer would give you the mark because 9/4 -9/4 =0 and the computer is set to mark that correct.

Bob

mathstudent2000
2013-08-11 06:05:03

what do you mean by computer marked?

bob bundy
2013-08-11 06:01:20

I suppose that is correct.  Bit strange though.  If you got the first k wrong, but knew to make it minus, you'd still get 0.  Wrong working but right answer.  Hhhmmm.  Worrying.  If I was testing a student, I'd ask for both answers, just to be certain.  Is this work computer marked by any chance?

Bob

mathstudent2000
2013-08-11 05:50:05

i got 0 since 3/2+-3/2 is 0

mathstudent2000
2013-08-11 05:48:36

what do you mean by just say minus the same for the second one

bob bundy
2013-08-11 05:39:32

That looks good to me.  Just say minus the same for the second one.

Bob

mathstudent2000
2013-08-11 05:29:05

i got one value for k (3/2) but i don't know how to get the other one

bob bundy
2013-08-11 05:15:44

When all lengths are increased by a scale factor k, each side of the square is k times bigger so the area gets bigger by a factor of k squared.

I would expect a single answer here, but the wording suggests more than one.  It is possible to dilate 'the other way' to generate a backwards square.  I guess that's a second answer.

Bob

mathstudent2000
2013-08-11 04:51:50

When a square of area 4 is dilated by a scale factor of k, we obtain a square of area 9. Find the sum of all possible values of k.

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